In Male Dress
Celebrating women who re-enact in mens clothing
In Male Dress
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beautifulswimmers:

Historians Matthew and Juliann Krogh interpret the lives of US Navy and Revenue Cutter Service mariners during the War of 1812 in a living history program at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum.
The program explored the shipbuilding traditions, uniforms, navigational techniques, rope work, small arms, medicine, games and sailing terms of marlinspike sailors, a fascinating chapter in the Chesapeake Bay’s long maritime history.
The food was bad, the work was hard, and the medicine was downright ugly, but there was opportunity for a regular wage and a bed (even if it was hanging from the rafters of a ship) for the courageous men and women who dared a seafaring life.
beautifulswimmers:

Historians Matthew and Juliann Krogh interpret the lives of US Navy and Revenue Cutter Service mariners during the War of 1812 in a living history program at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum.
The program explored the shipbuilding traditions, uniforms, navigational techniques, rope work, small arms, medicine, games and sailing terms of marlinspike sailors, a fascinating chapter in the Chesapeake Bay’s long maritime history.
The food was bad, the work was hard, and the medicine was downright ugly, but there was opportunity for a regular wage and a bed (even if it was hanging from the rafters of a ship) for the courageous men and women who dared a seafaring life.
beautifulswimmers:

Historians Matthew and Juliann Krogh interpret the lives of US Navy and Revenue Cutter Service mariners during the War of 1812 in a living history program at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum.
The program explored the shipbuilding traditions, uniforms, navigational techniques, rope work, small arms, medicine, games and sailing terms of marlinspike sailors, a fascinating chapter in the Chesapeake Bay’s long maritime history.
The food was bad, the work was hard, and the medicine was downright ugly, but there was opportunity for a regular wage and a bed (even if it was hanging from the rafters of a ship) for the courageous men and women who dared a seafaring life.
beautifulswimmers:

Historians Matthew and Juliann Krogh interpret the lives of US Navy and Revenue Cutter Service mariners during the War of 1812 in a living history program at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum.
The program explored the shipbuilding traditions, uniforms, navigational techniques, rope work, small arms, medicine, games and sailing terms of marlinspike sailors, a fascinating chapter in the Chesapeake Bay’s long maritime history.
The food was bad, the work was hard, and the medicine was downright ugly, but there was opportunity for a regular wage and a bed (even if it was hanging from the rafters of a ship) for the courageous men and women who dared a seafaring life.
beautifulswimmers:

Historians Matthew and Juliann Krogh interpret the lives of US Navy and Revenue Cutter Service mariners during the War of 1812 in a living history program at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum.
The program explored the shipbuilding traditions, uniforms, navigational techniques, rope work, small arms, medicine, games and sailing terms of marlinspike sailors, a fascinating chapter in the Chesapeake Bay’s long maritime history.
The food was bad, the work was hard, and the medicine was downright ugly, but there was opportunity for a regular wage and a bed (even if it was hanging from the rafters of a ship) for the courageous men and women who dared a seafaring life.
beautifulswimmers:

Historians Matthew and Juliann Krogh interpret the lives of US Navy and Revenue Cutter Service mariners during the War of 1812 in a living history program at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum.
The program explored the shipbuilding traditions, uniforms, navigational techniques, rope work, small arms, medicine, games and sailing terms of marlinspike sailors, a fascinating chapter in the Chesapeake Bay’s long maritime history.
The food was bad, the work was hard, and the medicine was downright ugly, but there was opportunity for a regular wage and a bed (even if it was hanging from the rafters of a ship) for the courageous men and women who dared a seafaring life.
beautifulswimmers:

Historians Matthew and Juliann Krogh interpret the lives of US Navy and Revenue Cutter Service mariners during the War of 1812 in a living history program at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum.
The program explored the shipbuilding traditions, uniforms, navigational techniques, rope work, small arms, medicine, games and sailing terms of marlinspike sailors, a fascinating chapter in the Chesapeake Bay’s long maritime history.
The food was bad, the work was hard, and the medicine was downright ugly, but there was opportunity for a regular wage and a bed (even if it was hanging from the rafters of a ship) for the courageous men and women who dared a seafaring life.
beautifulswimmers:

Historians Matthew and Juliann Krogh interpret the lives of US Navy and Revenue Cutter Service mariners during the War of 1812 in a living history program at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum.
The program explored the shipbuilding traditions, uniforms, navigational techniques, rope work, small arms, medicine, games and sailing terms of marlinspike sailors, a fascinating chapter in the Chesapeake Bay’s long maritime history.
The food was bad, the work was hard, and the medicine was downright ugly, but there was opportunity for a regular wage and a bed (even if it was hanging from the rafters of a ship) for the courageous men and women who dared a seafaring life.
beautifulswimmers:

Historians Matthew and Juliann Krogh interpret the lives of US Navy and Revenue Cutter Service mariners during the War of 1812 in a living history program at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum.
The program explored the shipbuilding traditions, uniforms, navigational techniques, rope work, small arms, medicine, games and sailing terms of marlinspike sailors, a fascinating chapter in the Chesapeake Bay’s long maritime history.
The food was bad, the work was hard, and the medicine was downright ugly, but there was opportunity for a regular wage and a bed (even if it was hanging from the rafters of a ship) for the courageous men and women who dared a seafaring life.
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ritasv:

Abbey Tournament Festival 2013 by Rob Masefield
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lamus-dworski:

Projekt “Epoki Warszawy”: lata 40. XX wieku. // Photography project “Epochs of Warsaw”: 1940s.
Projekt autorski © Martyna Jeziorska © Urszula Łęczycka © Jacek Szycht
WEBSITE | FACEBOOK
lamus-dworski:

Projekt “Epoki Warszawy”: lata 40. XX wieku. // Photography project “Epochs of Warsaw”: 1940s.
Projekt autorski © Martyna Jeziorska © Urszula Łęczycka © Jacek Szycht
WEBSITE | FACEBOOK
lamus-dworski:

Projekt “Epoki Warszawy”: lata 40. XX wieku. // Photography project “Epochs of Warsaw”: 1940s.
Projekt autorski © Martyna Jeziorska © Urszula Łęczycka © Jacek Szycht
WEBSITE | FACEBOOK
lamus-dworski:

Projekt “Epoki Warszawy”: lata 40. XX wieku. // Photography project “Epochs of Warsaw”: 1940s.
Projekt autorski © Martyna Jeziorska © Urszula Łęczycka © Jacek Szycht
WEBSITE | FACEBOOK
lamus-dworski:

Projekt “Epoki Warszawy”: lata 40. XX wieku. // Photography project “Epochs of Warsaw”: 1940s.
Projekt autorski © Martyna Jeziorska © Urszula Łęczycka © Jacek Szycht
WEBSITE | FACEBOOK
lamus-dworski:

Projekt “Epoki Warszawy”: lata 40. XX wieku. // Photography project “Epochs of Warsaw”: 1940s.
Projekt autorski © Martyna Jeziorska © Urszula Łęczycka © Jacek Szycht
WEBSITE | FACEBOOK
lamus-dworski:

Projekt “Epoki Warszawy”: lata 40. XX wieku. // Photography project “Epochs of Warsaw”: 1940s.
Projekt autorski © Martyna Jeziorska © Urszula Łęczycka © Jacek Szycht
WEBSITE | FACEBOOK
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stitchedupbears:

This is me at the Royal Gunpowder mills event reenacting :)
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dailyreenactor:

IMG_3527 lr-1 by MonumentBoy on Flickr.
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dailyreenactor:

History Live! 2013 - 4193 by Craig Wilkinson - Photography on Flickr.
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dailyreenactor:

IMG_3377 lr-1 by MonumentBoy on Flickr.
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johnmosesbrowningvevo:

lama-armonica:

Me! ^.^

Holy shit that’s one hell of a great setup
johnmosesbrowningvevo:

lama-armonica:

Me! ^.^

Holy shit that’s one hell of a great setup
johnmosesbrowningvevo:

lama-armonica:

Me! ^.^

Holy shit that’s one hell of a great setup
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nupeoftao:

thestickchick:

student-of-my-sensei:

Elizabeth Mazarake obtained a black belt in karate in her late 80’s. She passed away on September 12, 2012 at the age of 100.

I started the martial arts at age 39.  Now I feel like a young’un!

Oss
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humanoidhistory:

Happy birthday to Valentina Tereshkova, the first woman in space. She was born on March 6, 1937 in the village of Boyshoye Maslennikovo in central Russia. In June 1963, she lifted off aboard the Vostok 6 mission and she orbited the Earth 48 times, spending almost three days in space. Fun fact: In order to join the Cosmonaut Corps, Tereshkova was only honorarily inducted into the Soviet Air Force, making her the first civilian to fly in space. Two records, one trip.
Bonus fun fact: At the age of 77, she said last year that she was ready to come out of retirement to go on a one-way trip to Mars, her favorite planet.
(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)


I would so love to meet this lady in person :)
humanoidhistory:

Happy birthday to Valentina Tereshkova, the first woman in space. She was born on March 6, 1937 in the village of Boyshoye Maslennikovo in central Russia. In June 1963, she lifted off aboard the Vostok 6 mission and she orbited the Earth 48 times, spending almost three days in space. Fun fact: In order to join the Cosmonaut Corps, Tereshkova was only honorarily inducted into the Soviet Air Force, making her the first civilian to fly in space. Two records, one trip.
Bonus fun fact: At the age of 77, she said last year that she was ready to come out of retirement to go on a one-way trip to Mars, her favorite planet.
(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)


I would so love to meet this lady in person :)
humanoidhistory:

Happy birthday to Valentina Tereshkova, the first woman in space. She was born on March 6, 1937 in the village of Boyshoye Maslennikovo in central Russia. In June 1963, she lifted off aboard the Vostok 6 mission and she orbited the Earth 48 times, spending almost three days in space. Fun fact: In order to join the Cosmonaut Corps, Tereshkova was only honorarily inducted into the Soviet Air Force, making her the first civilian to fly in space. Two records, one trip.
Bonus fun fact: At the age of 77, she said last year that she was ready to come out of retirement to go on a one-way trip to Mars, her favorite planet.
(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)


I would so love to meet this lady in person :)
humanoidhistory:

Happy birthday to Valentina Tereshkova, the first woman in space. She was born on March 6, 1937 in the village of Boyshoye Maslennikovo in central Russia. In June 1963, she lifted off aboard the Vostok 6 mission and she orbited the Earth 48 times, spending almost three days in space. Fun fact: In order to join the Cosmonaut Corps, Tereshkova was only honorarily inducted into the Soviet Air Force, making her the first civilian to fly in space. Two records, one trip.
Bonus fun fact: At the age of 77, she said last year that she was ready to come out of retirement to go on a one-way trip to Mars, her favorite planet.
(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)


I would so love to meet this lady in person :)
humanoidhistory:

Happy birthday to Valentina Tereshkova, the first woman in space. She was born on March 6, 1937 in the village of Boyshoye Maslennikovo in central Russia. In June 1963, she lifted off aboard the Vostok 6 mission and she orbited the Earth 48 times, spending almost three days in space. Fun fact: In order to join the Cosmonaut Corps, Tereshkova was only honorarily inducted into the Soviet Air Force, making her the first civilian to fly in space. Two records, one trip.
Bonus fun fact: At the age of 77, she said last year that she was ready to come out of retirement to go on a one-way trip to Mars, her favorite planet.
(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)


I would so love to meet this lady in person :)
humanoidhistory:

Happy birthday to Valentina Tereshkova, the first woman in space. She was born on March 6, 1937 in the village of Boyshoye Maslennikovo in central Russia. In June 1963, she lifted off aboard the Vostok 6 mission and she orbited the Earth 48 times, spending almost three days in space. Fun fact: In order to join the Cosmonaut Corps, Tereshkova was only honorarily inducted into the Soviet Air Force, making her the first civilian to fly in space. Two records, one trip.
Bonus fun fact: At the age of 77, she said last year that she was ready to come out of retirement to go on a one-way trip to Mars, her favorite planet.
(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)


I would so love to meet this lady in person :)
humanoidhistory:

Happy birthday to Valentina Tereshkova, the first woman in space. She was born on March 6, 1937 in the village of Boyshoye Maslennikovo in central Russia. In June 1963, she lifted off aboard the Vostok 6 mission and she orbited the Earth 48 times, spending almost three days in space. Fun fact: In order to join the Cosmonaut Corps, Tereshkova was only honorarily inducted into the Soviet Air Force, making her the first civilian to fly in space. Two records, one trip.
Bonus fun fact: At the age of 77, she said last year that she was ready to come out of retirement to go on a one-way trip to Mars, her favorite planet.
(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)


I would so love to meet this lady in person :)
humanoidhistory:

Happy birthday to Valentina Tereshkova, the first woman in space. She was born on March 6, 1937 in the village of Boyshoye Maslennikovo in central Russia. In June 1963, she lifted off aboard the Vostok 6 mission and she orbited the Earth 48 times, spending almost three days in space. Fun fact: In order to join the Cosmonaut Corps, Tereshkova was only honorarily inducted into the Soviet Air Force, making her the first civilian to fly in space. Two records, one trip.
Bonus fun fact: At the age of 77, she said last year that she was ready to come out of retirement to go on a one-way trip to Mars, her favorite planet.
(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)


I would so love to meet this lady in person :)
humanoidhistory:

Happy birthday to Valentina Tereshkova, the first woman in space. She was born on March 6, 1937 in the village of Boyshoye Maslennikovo in central Russia. In June 1963, she lifted off aboard the Vostok 6 mission and she orbited the Earth 48 times, spending almost three days in space. Fun fact: In order to join the Cosmonaut Corps, Tereshkova was only honorarily inducted into the Soviet Air Force, making her the first civilian to fly in space. Two records, one trip.
Bonus fun fact: At the age of 77, she said last year that she was ready to come out of retirement to go on a one-way trip to Mars, her favorite planet.
(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)


I would so love to meet this lady in person :)
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harvestheart:

Sofija Jovanović, also known as the Serbian Jeanne d’Arc, joined the Serbian army under a male name upon the outbreak of WWI, early 1900s.   OjIkrsU
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